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Tuesday
May192015

grayson perry's dream house

The British are strange but I like it. Above are artist Grayson Perry’s drawings for a “secular chapel” celebrating the quintessential Essex woman. His aim was to create "a small, fabregé egg of a building" (which I love). The chapel-house is part of the Living Architecture project, a program which builds quirky modern houses to be rented out on holidays. I’ll be studying hand rendering in design school next semester and have thus become enamored with architectural drawings of all kinds – I thought Perry’s renderings were fantastic. Certainly not perfect, but whimsical and imaginative. See the finished “chapel” here

(via)

Tuesday
May122015

gucci westman + t magazine

I've long admired Gucci Westman's talent and sense of style (her House & Garden feature is one of my all-time favorites). So when I rediscovered this T Magazine piece on her home earlier today, I had to republish. I love the idea of framing dried flowers, epecially if the blooms hold significance. Wouldn't it be sweet to frame a few flowers from your wedding bouquet? :) Also, how amazing is that Colefax and Fowler wallpaper in the bedroom? Granny Chic at its absolute finest.

(photos by Macau trực tuyến BaccaratKava Gorna for T Magazine)

Wednesday
May062015

truman capote + the paris review

"Truman Capote lives in a big yellow house in Brooklyn Heights, which he has recently restored with the taste and elegance that is generally characteristic of his undertakings. As I entered he was head and shoulders inside a newly arrived crate containing a wooden lion.

“There!” he cried as he tugged it out to a fine birth amid a welter of sawdust and shavings. “Did you ever see anything so splendid? Well, that’s that. I saw him and I bought him. Now he’s all mine.”

“He’s large,” I said. “Where are you going to put him?”

“Why, in the fireplace, of course,” said Capote. “Now come along into the parlor while I get someone to clear away this mess.”

The parlor is Victorian in character and contains Capote’s most intimate collection of art objects and personal treasures, which, for all their orderly arrangement on polished tables and bamboo bookcases, somehow remind you of the contents of a very astute little boy’s pockets. There is, for instance, a golden Easter egg brought back from Russia, an iron dog, somewhat the worse for wear, a Fabergé pillbox, some marbles, blue ceramic fruit, paperweights, Battersea boxes, picture postcards, and old photographs. In short everything that might seem useful or handy in a day’s adventuring around the world..."

Excerpt from a 1955 interview with Capote as published in The Paris Review. Read the interview in full here. 

(photo of Capote's home via)

Tuesday
May052015

at home with inès de la fressange

I'm a day late and a dollar short, but did you see the December/January issue of Vogue Paris? It was all about Inès de la Fressange. My favorite editorial in the publication, of course, was this feature on her Parisian home. A few years ago, I posted two photos of her flat as seen in a British Vogue piece. Much to my delight, this Vogue article gives us a much more in depth look at the space. I love her trademark pink walls and the home's overall feeling of easy, lived-in elegance. Also, I'm dying for my own giant chalkboard wall. Inès is a genius!  

Monday
Apr272015

Sister Parish in Vogue

Sister Parish, doyenne of decorating, was interviewed for an article on current home trends in the June 1974 issue of Vogue. Swathed in leopard and floral fabric and outfitted in pearls, what she tells Vogue could be very well be published today. In ’74, she felt a resurgence of 18th century French and English furniture, and a return to both florals and unique, hand-made, high-quality items. She’ll mix them with modern elements, but traditional pieces will remain the bones of her rooms. It’s so fun to uncover these small pieces of history from titans of design. Though over forty years old, I think her advice and style will always remain relevant. Then again, I’ll always agree with her school of design.           

(Photo by Horst P. Horst)